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Article
October 1941

DETERMINATION OF UROBILINOGEN IN FECES AND IN URINE: A COMPARISON OF THE SPARKMAN AND THE WATSON PROCEDURE

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Division of Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;68(4):740-746. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200100079006
Abstract

Attempts to simplify and render more exact the methods available for estimating urobilinogen can meet only with approval. The difficulties inherent in the problem of determining this substance have prevented any method yet described from being more than roughly quantitative. The modification of Terwen's method which one of us (C. J. W.) has employed1 is admittedly not an exact procedure, but it was shown to recover added amounts of crystalline mesobilirubinogen and stercobilinogen with satisfactory limits of error; in addition, it has yielded consistent results in clinical work.2 This method provides for concentration, if necessary, of small amounts of urobilinogen from relatively large amounts of material, for instance, from grossly acholic feces, which may contain small but significant amounts of the substance. The same is true of relatively dilute urine containing urobilinogen in low concentration.

The method requires a four day collection of feces, and the average per

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