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Article
November 1941

SIGNIFICANCE OF BACTEREMIA CAUSED BY STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO CASES AND A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE CONCERNED WITH EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION IN ANIMALS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;68(5):851-875. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200110003001
Abstract

Within recent years there has been an increasing interest in the various aspects of infections caused in both man and animals by Staphylococcus aureus. In order to gather more information concerning the factors that influence the course of these infections in man, we have studied a group of 122 cases of bacteremia in which the causative agent was Staph. aureus. We were especially interested in analyzing these cases in the light of experimental infections as they have been produced in animals by numerous investigators.

ANALYSIS OF CASES  The 122 cases were observed at the Boston City Hospital over a seven year period. In all cases, the patients had demonstrable bacteremia on one or more occasions and the clinical course was entirely consistent with a severe infection. In only 22 cases did the patients recover, a fatality rate of 81.97 per cent.

Seasonal and Sex Incidence.  —There was no peak of

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