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Article
January 1942

SERUM PROTEINS IN CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER: II. NITROGEN BALANCE STUDIES ON FIVE PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Research Service, 1st Medical (Columbia) Division, Welfare Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;69(1):83-89. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200130093008
Abstract

It has not been clear from clinical studies whether the low values for serum albumin associated with cirrhosis of the liver are due to altered protein synthesis or to protein starvation, caused either by low protein intake or by faulty assimilation. Peters and Eisenman1 ascribed such hypoalbuminemia to insufficient protein intake. Myers and Keefer,2 however, observed 2 patients with cirrhosis of the liver and ascites and suggested that the hypoproteinemia was due to altered blood protein synthesis associated with the diminished hepatic function. The low serum albumin levels of their patients were unchanged during long periods of high protein feeding, although normal fecal nitrogen values during these periods indicated that the protein was assimilated. Grabfield and Prescott3 reported a positive nitrogen balance for 1 patient who had cirrhosis of the liver without ascites, but with normal blood proteins.

According to Ling4 and Liu, Chu, Wang and

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