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Article
March 1942

RESTING PERIPHERAL BLOOD FLOW IN THE HYPERTHYROID STATE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;69(3):409-416. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200150042003
Abstract

It is well established that cardiac output,1 blood volume,2 pulse pressure3 and pulse rate4 are significantly increased in the hyperthyroid state. In view of this, a corresponding augmentation in peripheral blood flow would also be expected. This concept has recently received support from the cutaneous temperature studies of Kirklin and his associates5 and from the work of Stewart and Evans,6 who measured heat loss in hyperthyroid patients with a Hardy-Soderstrom radiometer.7 By means of various calculations, the last-named authors expressed their data as blood flow to the skin in cubic centimeters per minute per square meter of body surface. Thus, they determined that the average blood flow was increased in the hyperthyroid state and decreased during iodine therapy and after subtotal thyroidectomy. Likewise, Kirklin and his associates5 reported that the cutaneous temperature of the big toe was significantly elevated before surgical treatment of exophthalmic goiter and that it

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