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Article
March 1942

DIFFUSION OF SULFANILAMIDE INTO ARTIFICIAL PERITONEAL FLUID

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;69(3):456-459. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200150089008
Abstract

It is commonly believed that sulfanilamide compounds diffuse readily from the blood into the tissue fluids and that an equilibrium between these two mediums is established rapidly. In commenting on this phenomenon, the majority of authors refer to the observations of Marshall and Long,1 which led to the conclusion that the distribution of sulfapyridine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-pyridine) between the blood and the tissues is "complete or nearly complete in five to ten minutes" after its administration intravenously. This conclusion was based on the observation that the most marked decrease in the concentration of sulfapyridine in the blood occurred during the first five to ten minutes, with only a relatively slight drop during the next hour. Review of their data, however, reveals that few determinations were made five and ten minutes after the compound was administered and that in the majority of instances sulfapyridine was present in the blood (and presumably in

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