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Article
May 1942

INDUCED THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1) DEFICIENCY AND THE THIAMINE REQUIREMENT OF MANFURTHER OBSERVATIONS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;69(5):721-738. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200170003001
Abstract

In earlier studies1 a group of 4 subjects was maintained for 147 days and another group of 4 subjects for 88 days on a diet containing not more than 0.15 mg. of thiamine (0.07 mg. for each 1,000 calories of the standard diet). This provision of thiamine represented a restriction to little more than a sixth of the amount of thiamine considered at the time to be the minimal daily requirement.2

The disease induced by this severe, isolated restriction of thiamine minutely resembled in the early stages the disturbance which commonly is known as "anxiety neurosis," but which the discriminating psychiatrist designates as "neurasthenia." At the end of the period of deprivation of thiamine the clinical picture was that of anorexia nervosa. Inactivity, apathy, serious derangement of metabolic processes, loss of weight and, finally, prostration, were observed in all subjects. None of these signs and symptoms developed in

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