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Article
July 1942

ACUTE CORONARY THROMBOSIS IN INDUSTRYI. DIRECT NONPENETRATING INJURIES, WITH REPORT OF CASES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(1):33-52. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200190043003
Abstract

The occurrence of acute coronary thrombosis in workers during regular employment has added another facet to the many-sided picture of this clinical entity. The present broad and liberal compensation laws1 definitely state that if a disease is caused, aggravated or precipitated by an incident arising out of and during the course of employment, then benefits should be paid and the employer assume the costs. A physician must determine whether the medical criteria of the law have been satisfied; namely, was a given incident capable of playing any etiologic role in the resulting disability? This should be a simple matter, but when the criteria are applied to acute coronary heart disease there is so much confusion and biased dogmatism that it is not unusual to find equally competent observers on opposite sides of the same question. This clinical study is presented in the hope of dispelling some of this confusion and

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