[Skip to Navigation]
Article
August 1942

PYELONEPHRITIS AND HYPERTENSION: A STUDY OF THEIR RELATION IN 11,898 NECROPSIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Pathology Laboratories, Cook County Hospital (Dr. Walter Schiller, director).

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(2):284-292. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200200104006
Abstract

The work of Goldblatt1 has shown that hypertension can be experimentally produced in animals by decreasing or altering the blood supply to the kidneys. Soon after the announcement of his experiments there began to appear in the literature clinical counterparts of his work. Mullholland2 reviewed the literature in this regard and classified the reported cases of hypertension resulting from interference with the blood flow through the kidneys in the following manner:

  • Intrinsic, infection within the kidney

  • Bilateral, resulting from

  • Benign obstruction of the prostate Partial obstruction of the ureters

  • Accompanying condition in the bladder causing clinical pyelonephritis

  • Stone

  • Diverticulum

  • Malignant growth

  • Bilateral infection

  • Unilateral, resulting from

  • Pyelonephritis

  • Calculi

  • Contracted kidney caused by

  • Trauma

  • Infection

  • Tuberculosis of kidney

  • Extrinsic, effecting interference with the circulation in the renal artery Unilateral

  1. Malposition

  2. Abnormal course and position of artery

  3. Atheromatous plaques

  4. Infarct of the kidney

  5. Thrombosis with recanalization

  6. Hydronephrosis with pressure on artery

×