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Article
August 1942

INTERMITTENT FEVER OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN: RECURRENT HIGH FEVER WITH BENIGN OUTCOME IN A PATIENT WITH MIGRAINE AND NOTES ON "NEUROGENIC" FEVER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(2):293-302. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200200113007
Abstract

"Neurogenic" fever is a term the limits of which have not been clearly defined. Lesions of the brain stem or the hypothalamus are known to be associated frequently with pyrexia.1 Typhoid vaccine and other foreign protein agents cause fever probably by functional alterations in the central nervous system.2 Whether this effect occurs by virtue of changes in circulation or by direct chemical action on cells of the thermoregulatory apparatus is not yet clear. Even less clear is the mechanism responsible for elevations of body temperature accompanying emotional disturbances. The fact that they do occur, however, has long been known. Most of the writing on the subject has appeared in the German literature. Friedmann and Kohnstamm3 in 1914 recognized that fever frequently accompanied excitement and emotional tension in the absence of physical overactivity. Seven years later Eichelberg4 was able to induce temperatures up to 39.2 C. (102.5

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