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Article
October 1942

MECHANISM OF PENTOTHAL SODIUM ANTIDIURESIS

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

From the Pharmacological Laboratory of the University of Virginia.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(4):567-584. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200220057005
Abstract

Extensive studies of the effects of barbiturates on renal function are few. Epstein investigated the influence of certain barbiturates on diuresis in rabbits caused by thyroxin1 and by sodium chloride.2 In 1930 Ogden3 described the action of amytal in inhibiting water diuresis in dogs during anesthesia, an observation which has been confirmed in many teaching laboratories. Walton4 and Gouax, Cordill and Eaton5 did not observe any significant effect of sodium amytal on the twenty-four hour output of urine, though this is rather misleading, since suppression of renal activity during a short period of anesthesia was compensated for by subsequent diuresis. It is, moreover, generally recognized that in clinical cases of severe sodium amytal intoxication secretion of urine is apt to be scanty.6 In the case of pentothal sodium, it has been reported that when the drug was used as an anesthetic in urologic practice, no change in

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