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Article
January 1943

EFFECT OF MASSIVE DOSES OF VITAMIN D ON CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS METABOLISM: OBSERVATIONS ON PATIENTS WITH ATROPHIC SPONDYLITIS AND WITH DEGENERATIVE ARTHRITIS OF THE SPINE

Author Affiliations

COLUMBUS, OHIO

From the Department of Research Surgery, Ohio State University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(1):78-94. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210010084007
Abstract

An adequate intake of vitamin D is essential for the optimal utilization of calcium and phosphorus in the normal metabolism of the human body. The minimal daily requirement is unknown, there being no conclusive experimental data on this subject. It is generally assumed that a daily intake of 300 to 600 U. S. P. units of vitamin D is sufficient. This is supplied to healthy persons by a well balanced diet and exposure to sunlight. In persons with chronic arthritis there may be inadequacy in both these factors. This has been suggested by Irons,1 who recommended that the deficiency be met by increasing the intake of vitamin D. Buckley2 advocated the use of cod liver oil as part of the general treatment of arthritis.

In recent years vitamin D has been used extensively in amounts greater than its physiologic requirement in the treatment of arthritis. It was originally

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