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Article
January 1943

ALLERGY: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE OF 1942

Author Affiliations

Lecturer in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital; BOSTON

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(1):107-132. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210010113009
Abstract

The field of allergy is being cultivated; also, it is being extended. The common allergic manifestations are hay fever, asthma and eczema, but other symptom complexes also may depend on allergy, and the list becomes longer as knowledge increases. More and more of the phenomena of allergy are being correlated with the phenomena of acute and chronic infections. Bacterial allergy is often hard to demonstrate, but nevertheless it undoubtedly plays a role in many difficult situations hard to understand without such a theory. Asthma often appears to be produced by acute colds and without other cause. One is almost forced to think of "bacterial allergy," but cutaneous tests made with various preparations of bacteria in the sputum do not give a reaction of immediate type, as might be encountered if the cause were ragweed or egg albumin— except in rare instances. Asthma, according to Landau and Gay,1 has been

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