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Article
March 1943

ANGINA PECTORIS AND THE SYNDROME OF PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; NEW YORK

From the Medical Service, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(3):301-314. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210030002001
Abstract

In previous communications1 we described certain relations between the syndrome of angina pectoris and that of peptic ulcer and called attention to certain clinical patterns: 1. The symptoms of peptic ulcer and anginal symptoms may occur suddenly and simultaneously, and occasionally acute peptic ulcer may be associated with coronary thrombosis. 2. Repeated attacks of angina pectoris at rest, finally eventuating in coronary thrombosis, may occur two to three hours after meals and during the night at the hours characteristic of pain from ulcer. 3. When symptoms of angina pectoris and peptic ulcer coexist, successful treatment for symptoms of ulcer may cause remission of the anginal syndrome. 4. Epigastric localization of anginal pain may be conditioned by a preexisting peptic ulcer.

In this paper we shall attempt an explanation of these phenomena and record additional illustrative cases. The common denominator that immediately suggests itself is a simultaneous disturbance in blood

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