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Article
April 1943

STUDIES ON THE ACTION OF QUINIDINE IN MAN: I. MEASUREMENT OF THE SPEED AND DURATION OF THE EFFECT FOLLOWING ORAL AND INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Research Laboratories of the Beth Israel Hospital and the Department of Medicine. Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(4):460-473. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210040019003
Abstract

The value of quinidine in the treatment of certain acute cardiac arrhythmias is well recognized. There are numerous references in the literature about the use of quinidine in treating chronic auricular fibrillation. In this condition, however, conversion to normal sinus rhythm is not urgent, and the dose of quinidine may be gradually increased over a period of days, if necessary, until the desired effect is obtained. In the acute or paroxysmal arrhythmias (auricular tachycardia, auricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, etc.) the abnormal rate and rhythm may cause cardiac pain, intense palpitation, dyspnea, faintness, vomiting, pulmonary edema, collapse and even death. Prompt treatment may be essential. Proper management of such conditions requires accurate knowledge of the speed and duration of action of the therapeutic agents employed. Little exact information is available, however, concerning the factors which determine the optimum methods for employing quinidine under such conditions.

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