[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.134.98. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1943

ENTEROCOCCIC INFECTIONS: AN EVALUATION OF THE IMPORTANCE OF FECAL STREPTOCOCCI AND RELATED ORGANISMS IN THE CAUSATION OF HUMAN DISEASE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(4):516-528. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210040075008
Abstract

That streptococci having distinctive properties are normally present in the contents of the human bowel and that these organisms may at times be the etiologic agents of infectious processes in man was first emphasized by Andrewes and Horder1 in 1906, who applied the descriptive term Streptococcus faecalis to them. Since that time a considerable literature has grown up dealing with various aspects of the classification of the fecal streptococci and organisms closely related to them, all of which have come to be included in a loosely defined group, the enterococci.

Very recently the development by Lancefield2 of a precipitin technic has permitted a more satisfactory classification of the hemolytic streptococci than had previously been possible, and it is now known that nearly all serious human infections, particularly those of the respiratory tract, are caused by members of her group A.3

Sherman has demonstrated that most of the

×