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Article
August 1943

EFFECT OF EXERCISE ON BLOOD PYRUVIC ACID: OBSERVATIONS ON TRAINED AND UNTRAINED NORMAL SUBJECTS AND ON PATIENTS WITH HEART DISEASE AND WITH HYPERTENSION

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Medicine of the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;72(2):239-244. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210080095008
Abstract

An increase of lactic acid in the blood and tissues following exercise is one of the classic observations in physiology. Since this discovery an extensive literature has accumulated on changes in lactic acid as related to work, training and fatigue. More recently Dill and his group1 have suggested that it be employed as an index of cardiovascular fitness. However, it is now the considered opinion of most biochemists2 that pyruvic acid, and not lactic acid, is the core of the carbohydrate metabolism of tissues. In the breakdown of dextrose by the tissues all reactions appear to revolve around pyruvic acid as the pivotal point. Further interest has been attached to pyruvic acid because of Peters'3 discovery that the presence of vitamin B1 is necessary for its oxidation. This displacement of lactic acid in the scheme of the carbohydrate metabolism of tissues by pyruvic acid led to

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