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Article
June 1944

INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSISA STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-SIX CASES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1944;73(6):449-459. doi:10.1001/archinte.1944.00210180021003
Abstract

Infectious mononucleosis, also called glandular fever, presents a problem in diagnosis to physicians, especially those attending large groups of young people. Although it is well known that any young febrile adult suffering with symptoms of a more or less simple sort (cold, sore throat, grip, etc.) should be suspected of having infectious mononucleosis and the necessary laboratory tests made to determine the fact definitely, the procedures are often overlooked. At the Stillman Infirmary, connected with Harvard University, my colleagues and I have observed and attended a large number of young men suffering from this disease. I believe that this is the largest series yet reported and made available for study. From 1935 up to and including June 1943 there were 12,601 men admitted to the Stillman Infirmary for medical care, of whom 249 had a discharge diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis. Of this number, 53 were eliminated as not presenting a

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