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Article
October 1944

GELATIN AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR PLASMA: OBSERVATIONS ON ITS ADMINISTRATION TO HUMAN BEINGS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1944;74(4):254-257. doi:10.1001/archinte.1944.00210220021003
Abstract

The intravenous administration of a solution of gelatin as a blood substitute for the treatment of clinical shock was first reported by Hogan1 in 1915. However, this demonstration of the possible efficacy of gelatin solution was forgotten until the present need for an adequate substitute for plasma, brought on by the present war, stimulated renewed interest in the possibilities of this substance.2 As a result of the recent increased interest gelatin is being studied more intensively. One of the important methods for evaluating any plasma substitute is to study its ability to relieve experimental shock in animals. However, the interpretations of data obtained from such experiments on animals are often complicated by many factors arising from the methods of producing experimental shock, and therefore conclusions from such experiments are not always applicable to the treatment of shock in human beings. This point has recently been stressed by Blalock.

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