[Skip to Navigation]
Article
October 1945

ABSENCE OF ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN TSUTSUGAMUSHI FEVER (SCRUB TYPHUS): REPORT OF TWO HUNDRED CONSECUTIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(4):217-218. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210340031004
Abstract

Observers of the tsutsugamushi fever (scrub typhus) which occurred in our Armed Forces early in the New Guinea Campaign, noted perivascular and interstitial infiltration of the myocardium with inflammatory cells plus changes in the muscle fibers of a varying degree.1 Weakness and tachycardia were not uncommon in soldiers convalescent from the more severe infections. Because of these observations, the impression has been gained that residual cardiac damage might follow tsutsugamushi fever.

The present study was undertaken to determine the possibility of electrocardiographic evidence of residual myocardial damage. Tracings were obtained for 200 consecutive patients admitted to a station hospital between May 23 and Sept. 1, 1944. Patients were seen at varying intervals following the onset of the disease. It will be seen in table 1 that 184 (92 per cent) of the group were examined within one to four weeks after the acute symptoms had subsided. Tracings were obtained

Add or change institution
×