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Article
November 1945

PAROXYSMAL HEMOGLOBINURIA DUE TO THE COLD HEMOLYSIN: OBSERVATIONS WITH A REPORT OF A CASE OF ITS OCCURRENCE IN AN AERIAL GUNNER

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(5):292-298. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210350038006
Abstract

Hemoglobinemia with resultant hemoglobinuria is exhibited in several varied clinical conditions. Notably these are (a) in a certain percentage of burns; (b) in some severe infectious diseases, including the exanthemas; (c) after extended physical exertion, as is seen in the so-called march hemoglobinuria1 of the soldier. and probably more specifically a myoglobinuria; (d) from organic toxins, such as venom, the deadly mushrooms and favism (a sensitivity reaction)—a disease which might appear in troops in Italy, especially southern Sicily, where the bean Vicia faba is plentiful; (e) in poisoning with chemicals such as toluylene diamine, saponin and photodynamic fluorescent hydrocarbons, including sulfonamide drugs and acridine dyes;2 (f) in blackwater fever sometimes complicating malaria; (g) in some forms of chronic hemolytic anemia known as Marchiafavia-Micheli, or nocturnal, hemoglobinuria3; (h) in severe cardiac decompensation; (i) from incompatibility in blood transfusions; (j) in reabsorption from internal hemorrhage, and (k) in certain

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