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Article
November 1945

STUDY OF WATER AND HEAT LOSS FROM THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF MAN: METHODS: I. A GRAVIMETRIC METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF WATER LOSS; II. A QUANTITATIVE METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF HEAT LOSS

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

From the Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine and Charity Hospital of Louisiana.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(5):308-314. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210350054008
Abstract

In any study of water loss from the human body it is necessary to measure that which leaves the respiratory system. Methods have been described, but they are either inaccurate or cumbersome. It is beyond the scope of this paper to review the methods used in the past to measure the water loss through the pulmonary system; many of these are referred to in several excellent discussions on insensible perspiration.1 Galeotti and his associates2 and Weyrich3 used bottles of sulfuric acid or calcium chloride to trap the expired water and measure gravimetrically the water collected. These are not simple procedures, and their accuracy is not well established. The observers did not control the conditions of the air inspired. The paper by Galeotti and Signorelli2a included a review of some of the early methods used to measure expired water. Loewy and Gerhartz4 measured the temperature of

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