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Article
May 1946

EFFECTS OF PLASMA AND FLUID ON PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS IN BURNED PATIENTS: Study of the Effects in the Victims of the Cocoanut Grove Fire

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), and the Burn Assignment to the Surgical Services, Boston City Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1946;77(5):477-490. doi:10.1001/archinte.1946.00210400002001
Abstract

THE victims of the Cocoanut Grove disaster, which occurred in Boston on the night of Nov. 28, 1943, offered a rather unusual opportunity for the study of the types of injury to the respiratory tract which may be expected when persons are exposed to smoke and flame resulting from rapid and extensive combustion in a relatively confined space. Since air conditioning has become commonplace and is increasing in popularity, the circumstances which gave rise to the Cocoanut Grove disaster might easily be duplicated in civilian life in situations in which combustible materials or mixtures of gases start to burn and cause an early disruption of the ventilating systems. Similar situations may arise when fires are caused by inflammable liquids or when explosives are set off or when fires gain headway in the holds of ships—and probably under many other circumstances. Few reports on the combination of extensive surface burns and

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