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Article
August 1946

CORONARY ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, CORONARY ANASTOMOSES AND MYOCARDIAL INFARCTIONA Clinicopathologic Study Based on an Injection Method

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1946;78(2):125-138. doi:10.1001/archinte.1946.00220020003001
Abstract

IN 1938 Schlesinger1 described a method for the postmortem study of changes in the coronary arteries which has opened a new field in the study of diseases of the coronary artery. At the University of Colorado School of Medicine 166 hearts have been studied thus far by the Schlesinger method. With this technic the right and left coronary arteries of the unembalmed heart are cannulated, and a mixture of agar and a lead salt is injected into the arteries. The agar is coagulated by cooling the heart, which is then unrolled by a series of incisions so that the coronary arteries are flattened out into one plane. The lead salt in the injection mixture is opaque to roentgen rays, and a roentgenogram is taken of the heart. An example of the roentgenogram which is obtained is shown in figure 1 I, in which the various parts of the heart

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