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Article
October 1946

HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCIC AND NONSTREPTOCOCCIC DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACTA Comparative Clinical Study

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1946;78(4):369-386. doi:10.1001/archinte.1946.00220040003001
Abstract

GREAT interest has been aroused in hemolytic streptococcic infection of the respiratory tract during recent years. This has been the result of the demonstration that such infection frequently initiates a complex nonsuppurative process, of which rheumatic fever is the most important and dramatic manifestation. A recent critical study1 showed that this disease was invariably preceded by a hemolytic streptococcic infection. In spite of this fact, definitive clinical studies of the nature of streptococcic infection of the respiratory tract are almost nonexistent. The Dicks2 and Dochez3 established the fact that scarlet fever is caused by hemolytic streptococci and showed that experimental infection in human beings was not always associated with rash formation. An immunologic explanation of this phenomenon was offered. Adequate monographs describing the natural history of scarlet fever are available but deal largely with the disease as observed in children.4

The splendid work of Lancefield5

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