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Article
October 1946

RETINAL AND CHOROIDAL ARTERIOLES IN MALIGNANT HYPERTENSIONA Clinical and Pathologic Study of Fifteen Cases

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1946;78(4):419-440. doi:10.1001/archinte.1946.00220040053004
Abstract

SINCE Richard Bright,1 in 1836, described the renal syndrome which came to bear his name, innumerable authors have contributed to the clarification and classification of renal disease and hypertension. Johnson,2 in 1868, was the first to describe the presence, in cases of Bright's disease, of a diffuse disease of the smallest arteries characterized by hypertrophy of the media. At the Mayo clinic, since the papers of Keith 3 and Keith, Wagener and Kernohan,4 a number of studies5 have served to emphasize the diffuse nature of hypertensive vascular disease. Beginning with the work of Kernohan, Anderson and Keith,6 an attempt has been made to establish the normal thickness of the wall of an arteriole as compared with its lumen and to determine what changes are to be found in hypertension. With a few notable exceptions, to be discussed later, it has been found that although the

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