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Article
September 1947

NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS OF INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS: With Special Reference to the Guillain-Barré Syndrome

Author Affiliations

BISMARCK, N. D.; PHILADELPHIA; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Medical Services, Army Air Force Station Hospital, Seymour Johnson Field, N. C., the laboratory service of the Army Service Forces Regional Station Hospital, Fort Bragg, N. C., and the Army Institute of Pathology, Washington, D. C.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;80(3):366-373. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220150076006
Abstract

INFECTIOUS mononucleosis has become a well known entity. The literature contains several articles describing in detail the classic clinical pictures. However, in cases which do not conform to the usual description the diagnosis is often confused or missed. In particular, this may be true when the symptoms are predominantly neurologic.

The involvement of the central nervous system may manifest itself by severe headaches, cranial nerve palsies, cerebellar signs and peripheral neuropathies. Thus there arises confusion with other diseases wherein neurologic symptoms are found. Infectious mononucleosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of various types of lymphocytic meningitis, encephalitis, poliomyelitis, polyneuritis and the Guillain-Barré syndrome.

The Guillain-Barré syndrome was originally described as a peripheral radiculoneuritis, with findings of an increased protein level in the spinal fluid, associated with a normal or only slightly elevated white blood cell count. Symptoms of meningitis or meningoencephalitis with involvement of the cranial nerves are

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