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Article
February 1948

MENINGOCOCCIC BACTEREMIA: WORTH B. DANIELS, M.D. WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1948;81(2):145-161. doi:10.1001/archinte.1948.00220200033005
Abstract

FROM September 1940, when mobilization for World War II began, to August 1945 about 14,500 soldiers with meningococcic infections were treated in army hospitals.1 This preliminary count is based on periodic summary reports in which bacteremia and meningitis are not differentiated, so that the exact number of cases of each form of the infection is not known. It is estimated, however, that not less than 5,000 soldiers were admitted with bacteremia uncomplicated by meningitis or with bacteremia prior to localization in the meninges.2

It is the purpose of this paper to describe meningococcic bacteremia as it was seen among soldiers during World War II and to illustrate in a report of cases the various forms which the disease assumed. Since the fatality rate for all types of meningococcic infection in the army during World War II was less than 5 per cent, it seems worth while to review the methods

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