[Skip to Navigation]
Article
January 1949

REACTION OF THE BODY TO POLIOMYELITIS AND THE RECOVERY PROCESS

Author Affiliations

UNIVERSITY, MISS.

From the Department of Pharmacology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;83(1):27-47. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00220300035002
Abstract

A YEAR and a half ago, while engaged in the study of clinical neurosurgery and neurology, I personally had a severe attack of poliomyelitis. Previously, I had also spent two years in neurophysiologic research, studying botulinus toxin, which causes a paralysis not unlike that of poliomyelitis.1 Therefore, I have followed my case with considerable interest, and I hope that the present discussion will make this experience of value to the entire medical profession.

I. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF THE DISEASE 

A. Virus Etiology.  —It is relatively certain that poliomyelitis is caused by a small virus which is hardy, resists many of the disinfectants, can live for long periods at low temperatures, exists abundantly in sewage during times of epidemics and is widespread among the populace.2 Independent observers have shown by electron microscopy that the virus is approximately 25 microns in size, with either a spherical or a slightly asymmetric

Add or change institution
×