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Article
March 1949

EXTRACELLULAR FLUID IN CARDIAC EDEMA AND ASCITES

Author Affiliations

BRONX, N. Y.

From the Pathological Laboratories at Fordham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;83(3):292-297. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00220320046003
Abstract

THE IMPORTANCE of determining quantitatively the amount of extracellular fluid deposited as edema or ascites in pathologic states is well appreciated. Previous laboratory methods for this determination were open to criticisms and objections. Experimental work showed that the chloride ion is confined principally to the extracellular area.1 In 1939, Wallace and Brodie2 compared the tissue Br to tissue Cl and conr serum Br serum Cl cluded that the ratio of distribution of these ions is similar in all tissues of the body with the exception of the brain. Later, Brodie, Brand and Leshin3 proposed a quantitative test for extracellular fluid by injection of sodium bromide intravenously and determination of its level in the serum and urine. Bromide was selected for this purpose since it is nontoxic in the doses administered, rapidly distributed throughout the body, slowly excreted and capable of accurate analysis. It is also dispersed

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