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Article
May 1949

PRESENT STATUS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE: Report of a Case with Autopsy

Author Affiliations

GRAND FORKS, N. D.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Grand Forks Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;83(5):515-527. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00220340040004
Abstract

INSULIN resistance is a curious clinical phenomenon, the exact etiologic mechanisms of which are as yet unknown. Since marked variations in sensitivity to insulin exist among both diabetic and nondiabetic patients, the term is popularly restricted to patients requiring 200 or more units of insulin daily to lower appreciably the blood sugar content.1 In terms of diabetic patients, the validity of this definition is enhanced by reports that depancreatized man probably requires only 35 to 50 units daily to control adequately the resultant diabetes.2

The term "insulin insensitive"3 has been suggested to characterize those diabetic patients who require less than 200 units daily but more than usual doses for adequate control. It is of interest that insulin resistance has been encountered in nondiabetic schizophrenic patients undergoing shock therapy.4 This renders any theory untenable which demands the coexistence of diabetes mellitus in all cases of insulin

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