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Article
September 1949

RELATION OF PULMONARY EMBOLISM TO PERIPHERAL THROMBOSIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;84(3):440-444. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00230030082007
Abstract

THE MOST dreaded complication of venous thrombosis is pulmonary embolism, for which the mortality rate is about 15 per cent.1 The need is for additional data which may be of help in understanding the thromboembolic phenomena and, thus, in reducing the danger. Accordingly, a necropsy study was made in the hope that it would yield information for further clinical and laboratory evaluation.

Knauer2 reported that the incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism in a series of 33,558 autopsies was 2.5 per cent. Barnes3 estimated that 34,000 persons die of pulmonary embolism each year in this country. Hunter and his co-workers4 observed that 52.7 per cent of older people confined to bed evidenced thrombosis of the deep veins of the leg. In the necropsies reported by them, pulmonary embolism accounted for 3.13 per cent of all deaths; the authors concluded that the most important single cause of thrombosis

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