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Article
October 1949

SYMPTOMS ATTRIBUTABLE TO COLD HEMAGGLUTINATION: Report of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Formerly Instructor in Medicine, New York University College of Medicine, and Assistant Visiting Physician, Third Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;84(4):523-531. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00230040002001
Abstract

THE PHENOMENON of cold hemagglutination was recognized fifty years ago and gave rise to an extensive foreign literature during the first part of this century. Since its relationship to primary atypical pneumonia was pointed out by Peterson, Ham and Finland,1 in 1943, the subject has received considerable attention in this country. Whereas cold hemagglutination was originally regarded as a phenomenon of mainly academic interest, it became increasingly evident not only that it was a valuable diagnostic aid in some epidemics of primary atypical pneumonia but that it could give rise to certain definite symptoms occasionally serious in character and directly related to intravascular hemagglutination. Agglutination of all types of red blood cells at cold temperatures by serum, with reversal at warm temperatures, occurs in a wide variety of conditions.2 Cold hemagglutination appears to be transient in acute infectious diseases, in trypanosomiasis, in acute hemolytic anemia and in some

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