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Article
October 1949

HEMATOLOGIC STUDIES IN HIROSHIMA AND A CONTROL CITY TWO YEARS AFTER THE ATOMIC BOMBING

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; Associate Geneticist, Laboratory of Vertebrate Biology, and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School ANN ARBOR, MICH.; HIROSHIMA, JAPAN

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;84(4):569-604. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00230040048005
Abstract

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

  • Introduction

  • Present Day Conditions in Japan

    • Plan of Observation 
    • General Data

    • Subjects

    • Precautions

  • General Procedures

    • Hematologic Procedures and Evaluation of Errors 
    • Erythrocyte and Leukocyte Counts

    • Determination of Hemoglobin and Plasma Protein Content

    • Hematocrit Reading

    • Determination of Cell Constants

    • Differential Count

    • Reticulocyte Count

    • Laboratory Checks

  • Control Studies on Americans

  • Statistical Procedures

    • Presentation of Data 
    • Over-All Blood Picture

    • Relation Between Age and Sex and Response to Atomic Bombing

    • Relation Between Traumatic Injuries and Flash Burns and Hematologic Observations

    • Relation Between Amount of Radiation and Hematologic Observations

  • Comment

  • Summary

INTRODUCTION  THE ATOMIC bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the August 1945, subjected large numbers of persons to significant amounts of radiation. The immediate, acute effects of the exposure have been evaluated by a group of United States Army and Navy and Japanese civilian investigators, usually referred to as the Joint Commission.1 Their observations did much to confirm and

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