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Article
June 1950

ASPIRATION BIOPSY OF BONE MARROW AS AN AID IN DIAGNOSIS OF HISTOPLASMOSIS: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Hematology Laboratory and the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research of the Cook County Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;85(6):893-899. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230120002001
Abstract

MEDICAL history is replete with examples of diseases previously unknown that suddenly became commonplace. In the case of infectious diseases there is always an element of doubt whether the malady is actually becoming more widespread or is simply being more widely recognized. Evidence gleaned from experience with noninfectious diseases points to the latter possibility. So it seems with histoplasmosis. Between the first description by Darling1 in 1906 and the review of the subject by Parsons and Zarafonetis2 in 1945, only 71 cases were reported. Yet, from 1945 to 1949 an additional 42 cases3 of proved histoplasmosis have been recorded, and there are those who feel that the disease is sufficiently common to be responsible for much of the pulmonary calcification previously attributed to tuberculosis.4

The protean manifestations of histoplasmosis make diagnosis difficult, and neither in vivo (skin) nor in vitro (precipitin) tests have been found completely

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