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Article
August 1950

EFFECT OF FEEDING EGG YOLK AND CHOLESTEROL ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL LEVELS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Research Service, Third (New York University) Medical Division, Goldwater Memorial Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;86(2):189-195. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230140025004
Abstract

THE ROLE OF exogenous cholesterol as a factor in the development of arteriosclerosis has received much attention and attempts to raise serum cholesterol levels in human beings have been made.1 In general, it appears difficult to alter substantially serum cholesterol levels in normal human beings by feeding cholesterol or cholesterol-containing substances. Evidence concerning the reasons for this difficulty is accumulating. Endogenous sources of cholesterol appear to be of great importance.2 One report suggested that cholesterol fed in the diet tends to depress synthesis in the body.3

Although the number of patients studied by us is small and the relation of plasma cholesterol levels to the development of arterial disease in man is not clear, it was thought worth while to report the results of the present study for two reasons: first, because of the duration of the experimental feeding periods and, second, because the results show clearly

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