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Article
October 1950

AUREOMYCIN IN PREVENTION OF BACTEREMIA FOLLOWING TOOTH EXTRACTION

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Medicine, Hospital of St. Raphael, and from the Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine.; From the Oral Surgery Service, Hospital of St. Raphael.; From the Medical Service, Hospital of St. Raphael.; From the Department of Laboratories, Hospital of St. Raphael.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(4):498-504. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230160010002
Abstract

SINCE the advent of antibiotics, the prognosis of subacute endocarditis has been improved greatly; nevertheless the disease is still fatal in about 50 per cent of patients. It is by no means a rare sickness, particularly in areas where rheumatic heart disease is common. Patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis will, in almost every case, have had either a preexisting lesion of one of the cardiac valves or a congenital cardiac deformity. The valvular lesion may have been caused by rheumatic fever, syphilis or arteriosclerotic changes and is often unknown to the patient. Lesions due to arteriosclerosis are of special importance because they are the nidus on which bacterial infection develops in older persons. The majority of patients, however, are between 20 and 40 years of age, the sexes being almost equally afflicted.

The commonest organism causing subacute bacterial endocarditis is Streptococcus viridans. When this organism causes a transitory bacteremia in

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