[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1950

PROPHYLAXIS OF MOTION SICKNESS: Evaluation of Some Drugs in Seasickness

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL SERVICE CORPS, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE; RANDOLPH FIELD, TEXAS; UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(6):810-822. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230180015002
Abstract

MOTION sickness represents a response to a particular pattern of vestibular discharges which are generated chiefly in the utriculus of the labyrinth and stimulate pathways through the cerebellum to the brain stem.1 The response requires a lengthy process of summation since minutes to hours are needed until the vestibular discharges induce a variety of symptoms which culminate in vomiting. Conversely, a relatively rapid process of adaptation may suppress the manifestations of motion sickness. In addition, there are other ways of weakening or preventing the response. Thus, the effect of motion is minimized by assuming a supine position, which greatly reduces the stimulation of the utriculus. Further, the reduction of psychological, visual, visceral or other facilitating influences may lower the incidence of motion sickness. Finally, there are certain drugs which are preventive.

During World War II extensive investigations centered on parasympatholytic agents, central nervous system stimulants or depressants, vitamins or

×