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Article
December 1950

ALTERATIONS IN RENAL FUNCTION, INCLUDING HEMATURIA, IN MAN DURING INTRACRANIAL AIR STUDIESAlterations in Cardiac Function

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Departments of Medicine and Neurosurgery, Wadsworth General Hospital, and the Brentwood Neuropsychiatric Hospital, United States Veterans Administration Center, and the Department of Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(6):857-871. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230180062005
Abstract

THE QUESTION of the relationship between the central nervous system and the kidney is of great significance and involves not only somatic vasomotor and endocrine shifts in water balance 1 but possibilities in nephritis as well. In previous experiments on the unanesthetized dog, purely central nervous stimuli, osmotic, alkaloidal and hormonal, were shown2 to produce drastic alterations in renal function, including albuminuria and hematuria. The clinical experiments hereafter detailed attempt primarily to demonstrate whether analogous changes occur in man following a purely central nervous stimulus. The evidence for direct relationship between brain and heart has been previously summarized,3 and electrocardiographic changes after pneumoencephalography have been demonstrated.4 In our patients studied by ventriculography and pneumoencephalography electrocardiographic analyses were coincidentally obtained.

The occasional occurrence of an oliguria following ventriculography and encephalography leads one to believe that a direct relationship may exist between central nervous stimulation and total suppression of

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