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Article
January 1951

INSULIN-RESISTANT DIABETES PRECIPITATED BY CORTISONE AND REVERSED BY NITROGEN MUSTARD

Author Affiliations

Assistant Resident in Medicine; Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hospital; Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College; Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, New York Medical College; Assistant Attending Physician, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals NEW YORK

From the Medical Service, Memorial Hospital Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;87(1):124-127. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810010134010
Abstract

IT IS WELL known that certain adrenal cortex hormones have a profound effect on carbohydrate metabolism. Ingle1 has induced frank diabetes in normal rats with daily doses of 5 to 10 mg. of cortisone. Sprague and his associates2 have contrasted the action of cortisone in subjects who had Addison's disease alone with its effect on patients who had coexisting diabetes and Addison's disease. In the former cortisone abolished the tendency toward development of hypoglycemia; in the latter cortisone greatly increased dextrose excretion. In nondiabetic subjects cortisone produced abnormal dextrose tolerance curves.2

The following case history is reported because the administration of nitrogen mustard (methyl-bis [beta-chloroethyl] amine hydrochloride) reversed an insulinresistant diabetes which developed when cortisone was given to a diabetic patient.

REPORT OF CASE  M. Z., a 53 year old white married man, was first admitted to Memorial Hospital on March 16, 1950, with a diagnosis

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