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Article
December 1951

HYPOCELLULAR MARROW IN ACUTE LEUKEMIAReport of Two Cases

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;88(6):803-811. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810120104010
Abstract

IN ACUTE leukemia, with or without peripheral leucocytosis, sternal-marrow aspiration by the Arinkin technique characteristically reveals marked hyperplasia with a predominance of immature "blast" cells.1 Because of this usually typical picture, marrow study is of particular importance in differentiating cases of acute leukemia without peripheral leucocytosis from cases of aplastic anemia and granulocytopenia.

We are reporting two cases of acute leukemia with peripheral leucopenia which are atypical in that the patients presented hypocellular marrows rather than the usual hypercellularity. One patient had persistent leucopenia and a hypoplastic marrow throughout his course. The other, during a relapse following cortisone therapy, had hypercellular marrow with associated leucocytosis.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —This was the first admission (July 10, 1950) to the Bronx Veterans Administration Hospital of a 63-year-old married white male bridge operator, with the chief complaint of painless "swollen glands" of three months' duration. These enlarged lymph nodes first

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