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Article
September 1952

ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME EXUDATIVUM: Study of Fifteen Cases

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Service of Harlem Hospital, Dr. Alexander Altschul, Director of Medicine.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1952;90(3):310-319. doi:10.1001/archinte.1952.00240090031004
Abstract

ERYTHEMA multiforme exudativum is by no means a rare disease. Unfortunately, this malady has been reported under a variety of labels and eponyms, so that up to very recently the picture was almost a mass of utter confusion. A timely and recent editorial in The Journal of the American Medical Association1 concerning this condition is worthy of careful perusal.

In 1860, Hebra2 described a new clinical picture under the name erythema multiforme exudativum. In 1862, Alibert and Bazin3 described lesions in the mouth associated with constitutional symptoms and distinguished the herpetic lesion of the iris. In 1922, Stevens and Johnson,4 in describing what they called a "new eruptive fever," stressed as their criteria for diagnosis a generalized maculopapular eruption associated with ulceromembranous stomatitis, purulent conjunctivitis, and fever. In 1937, Klauder5 popularized in this country a new symptom complex known in the French literature as ectodermosis erosiva pluriorificialis. This was described

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