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Article
August 1953

RESIDUALS OF YELLOW FEVER VACCINE AFTER TEN YEARS: A Medical and Legal Problem

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

From National Rehabilitation Commission, The American Legion, and Department of Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1953;92(2):221-227. doi:10.1001/archinte.1953.00240200071009
Abstract

IT IS MORE than 10 years since the recognition of the epidemic of homologous serum hepatitis that followed the use of yellow fever vaccine which contained, as a diluent, human serum. That many lots of this particular vaccine were icterogenic has been documented by many observers, notably Sawyer and his associates,1 Capps and his associates,2 and Hayman and Read.3 Recently, Stebbins4 has reviewed from the epidemiologic point of view the implications of this experience. While certain lots of vaccine were shown to be highly icterogenic,1 none of the donors of the serum used in these lots had experienced jaundice or hepatitis within nine months prior to the donation, although all had had jaundice sometime in the past. It appears that a chronic carrier state may develop in persons suffering from viral hepatitis and that the infectious agent may be carried in the blood in sufficient virulence to produce illness in

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