[Skip to Navigation]
Article
October 1953

MALIGNANT HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH RENAL ARTERY OCCLUSIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratory and Medical Divisions, Montefiore Hospital; Assistant Resident Pathologist (Dr. Ehrlich), Assistant, Medical Division (Dr. Brodoff), Associate Attending Physician, Medical Division (Dr. Rubin), Associate Pathologist (Dr. Berkman).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1953;92(4):591-601. doi:10.1001/archinte.1953.00240220139017
Abstract

GOLDBLATT1 and Wilson and Byrom2 have shown experimentally that occlusion of renal arteries in animals results in sustained hypertension. Yuile3 reviewed the relation of obstructive lesions of the main renal arteries to hypertension in man and concluded that in only a small percentage of the reported cases could a definite etiologic relationship be established between the vascular lesion and the elevation of blood pressure.

This report is concerned with the unusual case of a young woman with a documented long history of normotension who died from the sequelae of a short course of malignant hypertension associated with recent thrombotic unilateral renal artery occlusion. The concurrent onset of malignant hypertension and complete occlusion of a renal artery strongly suggests an etiologic relationship.

REPORT OF A CASE  M. A., a 32-year-old white woman, was admitted to Montefiore Hospital on Jan. 26, 1952, because of severe abdominal pain, sudden blindness,

×