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Article
February 1954

INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS AND GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME: Report of Three Cases

Author Affiliations

(U. Dubl.); DETROIT

From the Department of Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital: Resident in Medicine (Drs. Raftery and Schumacher); Physician-in-Charge, Division of Neurology (Dr. Grain); Physicianin-Charge, Division of Infectious Diseases (Dr. Quinn).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954;93(2):246-253. doi:10.1001/archinte.1954.00240260082007
Abstract

THE OCCURRENCE of nervous system involvement as a complication of infectious mononucleosis has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. The first report of such an association was by Johansen1 in 1931; later in the same year Epstein and Dameshek2 reported a case in this country. In 1950, Bernstein and Wolff,3 reviewing the literature from 1931 to 1947, found 28 reports, involving a total of 46 patients, with neurologic complications of infectious mononucleosis. They estimated that the incidence of this complication is very low, "certainly not over one per cent, and probably less." This estimate appears justified, as Contratto,4 in a series of 196 cases, and Milne,5 with 141 cases, observed no instance of nervous system involvement.

Despite its low incidence, nervous system involvement ranks high among the causes of death in infectious mononucleosis. Lawrence6 notes that of 16 reported fatalities7 resulted from neurologic complications. Spontaneous rupture of the

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