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Article
September 1954

SUBJECTIVE MANIFESTATIONS OF ACUTE CORONARY OCCLUSION OR INSUFFICIENCY: Their Relation to Area of Resulting Myocardial Injury

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954;94(3):341-350. doi:10.1001/archinte.1954.00250030011003
Abstract

EVER SINCE 1768, when Heberden 1 introduced the term "angina pectoris" to describe "a disorder of the heart marked with strong and peculiar symptoms and a sense of strangling and anxiety," the term has occupied a prominent place in medical literature. The underlying causes of the syndrome were a matter of speculation until the turn of the century. Satterthwaite,2 in his textbook "Diseases of the Heart and Aorta," published as late as 1905, quotes various authorities of the 19th century who attributed the condition to disease of the pneumogastric, to infiltration of the cardiac plexus, to functional neurosis, to nerve explosion like that of epilepsy, to phrenic and intercostal irritation, to bronchiothoracic neuralgia, and to aortic disease. Although he also quotes many authors who considered the condition to be due to coronary disease, he commented on the relative rarity of angina pectoris compared with the great frequency of coronary

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