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Article
March 1955

Corticoid Therapy in Eye Diseases: Sustained Restoration of Vision in Certain Eye Diseases Considered Corticoid-Refractory or Clinically Irreversible

Author Affiliations

U. S. Army; Pontiac, Mich.; Detroit

From The Unit for Metabolic Research, Department of Medicine and the Department of Ophthalmology, Wayne University College of Medicine and City of Detroit Receiving Hospital, and the Rackham Arthritis Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and the Department of Ophthalmic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School. Director, The Unit for Metabolic Research, and Armour Fellow in Quantitative Human Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Department of Medicine, Wayne University College of Medicine and City of Detroit Receiving Hospital (Dr. Wolfson); Instructor in Ophthalmic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School; Instructor in Ophthalmology, Wayne University College of Medicine (Dr. Quinn); Instructor in Ophthalmology, Wayne University College of Medicine (Dr. Spearman).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1955;95(3):400-410. doi:10.1001/archinte.1955.00250090038006
Abstract

By early 1950, short-term corticotropin treatment at modest dosage levels was shown to give only incomplete or transient improvement in the more serious acute disorders of the posterior ocular segment or optic nerve, while, in more chronic eye diseases, it seldom gave any significant relief. In an attempt to improve upon these results, we began a study of the response to intensive long-acting corticotropin treatment, fully individualized both in dosage and duration of therapy. Originally, there were envisioned only trials in patients with those acute eye diseases which had been reported to respond unsatisfactorily to hormonal treatment. However, as the study progressed, it occasionally became necessary to treat a patient who presented suitable acute lesions in one eye and older, apparently inactive, clinically irreversible lesions in the other eye as a result of previous attacks of the same illness. In several such patients, the first of whom is illustrated by

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