[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1958

Solitary Benign Adenoma of the Liver Associated with Progressive Hepatic Insufficiency: Report of a Case with Autopsy Findings

Author Affiliations

Salt Lake City

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1958;101(3):645-649. doi:10.1001/archinte.1958.00260150133017
Abstract

Benign adenoma of the liver are observed infrequently. An unusual opportunity was provided to study the effects of such a tumor in a girl who was followed for several years because of recurrent and progressive signs of hepatic insufficiency. Ultimately, abdominal exploration disclosed a large solitary tumor of the liver. Histologically, this consisted of masses of liver cord cells. After attempted extirpation of the tumor, the patient died and was autopsied. Both gross and histologic studies lent support to the concept that this tumor was benign. Of special interest was the fact that a liver biopsy specimen taken 22 months prior to death was identical in histologic appearance with sections of the tumor obtained at autopsy. However, the true significance of the biopsy finding was not appreciated, and this patient was regarded as presenting a difficult diagnostic problem during the two years prior to the surgical exploration.

Report of Case 

×