[Skip to Navigation]
[Skip to Navigation Landing]
Article
February 1959

Chronic Renal Disease with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Departments of Medicine of Presbyterian-St. Luke's, Cook County, and Research and Educational Hospitals, and the Departments of Pathology and Medicine of the University of Illinois College of Medicine. Research Associate in Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and Research Fellow, Department of Medicine, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital (Dr. Pollak). Formerly Resident in Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine; present address: Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (Dr. Schneider). Clinical Instructor in Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Freund). Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Attending Physician, Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois and Cook County Hospital, and Associate Attending Physician, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital (Dr. Kark).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1959;103(2):200-218. doi:10.1001/archinte.1959.00270020028004
Abstract

Since the observations of Lucas, in 1883,1 it has been known that abnormalities of the skeletal system occur in patients ill with chronic renal disease. These include rickets, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, osteosclerosis, and osteitis fibrosa.2-6 Osteitis fibrosa occurs only in association with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. It was, therefore, surprising to find on reviewing the literature very few well-documented instances of renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism, i. e., with osteitis fibrosa and significant enlargement of the parathyroid glands. In this paper we report the clinical and pathological features of renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism in 17 patients. In addition, the 25 cases reported in detail in the literature are reviewed and the important clinical and pathological features are discussed.

At the present time reliable chemical or biological methods for the assay of parathyroid hormone in blood do not exist. In the absence of such a method, we have

×