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Article
May 1959

Needle Biopsy of the Peritoneum: A Preliminary Report

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

From the Pulmonary Disease Division, Cancer Chemotherapy Research Program, the Georgetown University Medical Division of the District of Columbia General Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine. Associate Medical Officer, Pulmonary Disease Division, District of Columbia General Hospital, and Instructor in Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine (Dr. Donohoe); Assistant Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine, and Chief Visiting Physician and Director of Cancer Chemotherapy Research Program, Georgetown Medical Division, District of Columbia General Hospital (Dr. Shnider); formerly Fellow in Medicine, Cancer Chemotherapy Research Program, Georgetown Medical Division, District of Columbia General Hospital (Dr. Gorman).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1959;103(5):739-745. doi:10.1001/archinte.1959.00270050061010
Abstract

The surgical removal of diseased tissue from the body and subsequent careful examination by histologic, biologic, and even chemical analyses has greatly enhanced our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of many disease entities. Furthermore, it has provided the clinician with a rational foundation for specific therapy, replacing regimens previously employed, many of which had been based solely on empirical principles. In recent years, the introduction of the Vim-Silverman or similar type biopsy needles, combined with the resurrection and reevaluation of needle aspiration techniques, has provided us with invaluable information especially in hepatic and renal disease. Smetana1 recently reviewed the experiences with specimens obtained by needle biopsy submitted for pathologic study and concluded that this procedure, properly and judiciously employed, has distinct advantages over many presently accepted diagnostic techniques. Since the first report of serous membrane needle biopsy, by DeFrancis,2 in 1955, others have reported more extensive studies

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