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Article
October 1961

Neurologic Complications of Acute Uremia

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School and the Medical Service of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.; Instructor in Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Associate in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Assisting Physician in Neurology, Boston City Hospital (Dr. Locke); Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Senior Associate in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (Dr. Merrill); Instructor in Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Senior Associate in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (Dr. Tyler).

Arch Intern Med. 1961;108(4):519-530. doi:10.1001/archinte.1961.03620100011003
Abstract

Introduction  Attempts to evaluate the effects of uremia on the nervous system must separate those aspects secondary to the uremia from those attributable to the underlying disorder. Many diseases which affect the kidneys also directly affect the nervous system. In an attempt to distinguish the effects of uremia on the nervous system, a series of patients with acute uremia was studied. Cases of lupus erythematosus, sclerodema, polyarteritis nodosa, multiple myeloma, polycystic disease, and severe hypertension with renal involvement were excluded from consideration. Included in the category of acute renal failure were all cases in which there was no evidence of renal disease antedating the present illness and in which an acute insult could be postulated.Thirteen consecutive patients with acute anuria were seen in neurological consultation after admission to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. They were examined daily until discharged or until death. Specific attention was directed to the mental

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